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Hepatitis B

Viral HepatitisHepatitis AHepatitis C

Hepatitis B is a liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis B virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. Hepatitis B is usually spread when blood, semen, or another body fluid from a person infected with the Hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact with an infected person or sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment. Hepatitis B can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby at birth.

Hepatitis B can be either acute or chronic. Acute Hepatitis B virus infection is a short-term illness that occurs within the first 6 months after someone is exposed to the Hepatitis B virus. Acute infection can — but does not always — lead to chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis B virus infection is a long-term illness that occurs when the Hepatitis B virus remains in a person's body. Chronic Hepatitis B is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, and even death.

The best way to prevent Hepatitis B is by getting vaccinated.

Alaska Surveillance Data

Resources for the General Public

Resources for Healthcare Providers

Hepatitis B is a public health reportable condition in Alaska.  Reports must be made within 5 working days after being suspected or diagnosed.  Please call the Alaska Section of Epidemiology at 907-269-8000.
 

Infectious Disease Program Resources

Other Resources