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Play Every Day Blog > Posts > Hungry for breakfast? Petersburg High School will give you a second chance
 

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April 14
Hungry for breakfast? Petersburg High School will give you a second chance

It’s just after 9 a.m., you’ve missed breakfast, you’re hungry, and lunch is still hours away. What do you do?

If you go to Petersburg High School, you’re in luck. Second Chance Breakfast foods.jpg
It’s called the Second Chance Breakfast, and Petersburg High School offers it between 9:20 and 9:30 a.m. every day of the school year. Ginger Evens from the Petersburg City School District said the breakfast is one way to help students be more alert in the morning and successful in class.
Petersburg High School has about 140 students who start school at 8:30 every day. About 20 students show up at 7:30 for an early-morning band class and some high school students rush to get to school, run late and show up on an empty stomach, Evens said.
“When we serve Second Chance Breakfast at 9:20, then they’re ready to eat something,” she said.
The school does not have pre-school breakfast service but it has offered Second Chance Breakfast since January 2014. Last school year, an average of 28 students and staff ate the extra breakfast every day; this school year, the extra breakfast was moved to an earlier time each morning and about 18 people eat each day. Evens said the district is watching the numbers to see if any changes are needed to improve the program. Second Chance Breakfast Cart.jpg
Petersburg’s extra breakfast is a collaboration between the district’s food service program and several classes at the high school. A student from the metal shop class built the cart that serves the breakfast, and students from special education classes prepare the cart each morning and hand out several options for purchase, including fruit, whole-grain snacks, milk, yogurt and granola — foods that meet the federal nutrition guidelines.
The Second Chance Breakfast costs $2 for students and $3 for staff, but it is free or less expensive for those who qualify for free and reduced-cost meals served at school, Evens said. The students running the breakfast cart collect the money and then put the proceeds back into the school’s food service program, said Evens, the district’s Healthy Living Grant Coordinator.
Petersburg is one of eight school districts across Alaska that received a grant from the state’s Obesity Prevention and Control Program to improve physical activity and nutrition options for students. The grant funding helped the school purchase a refrigerator to store the breakfast food, as well as materials to serve it, Evens said.
Petersburg High School plans to continue offering the Second Chance Breakfast. Evens said the extra morning meal is critical to some students who lack food at home.
“The food that they are getting at school is really the only food that they are getting,” she said. “It’s really important that we provide nutritious foods for them.”