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What is Autism? Events

Autism Network

Learn more about the Providence Autism Diagnostic Network and its services focused on diagnosing autism and other developmental disorders.

Contact us

Call 269-3400 or (800) 799-7570 if calling from outside Anchorage. You also can reach Alaska's Autism Program by emailing hss.autism@alaska.gov.

Frequently Asked Questions about Autism

I am concerned that my child may not be developing normally. Who should I contact?

I am worried that I may not be able to afford the testing needed to find out if my child has autism, and the treatment needed following a diagnosis. What kind of financial resources are available to help?

  • Contact the Alaska Division of Public Assistance to find out if you qualify for assistance through Denali KidCare or TEFRA (Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act). For more information, call (907) 269-6529 or (888) 318-8890.

What support and resources are available in my area of Alaska?

What causes autism?

  • Despite ongoing research, we do not know all of the causes of autism spectrum disorders. However, we have learned that there are likely many causes of different types of autism disorders. Environmental, biologic and genetic factors may make one child more likely to develop an autism disorder than another child.
  • To find out more about current and credible autism research, visit the CDC Web site.

Do vaccines cause autism?

  • Many studies have examined whether there is a relationship between vaccines and autism spectrum disorders. At this time, these studies continue to show that vaccines are not associated with autism disorders.
  • The State of Alaska and CDC, however, know that some parents and others still have concerns about vaccinations. The CDC has joined the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) and will work with the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) to address these concerns. The National Vaccine Advisory Committee makes recommendations regarding the National Vaccine Program. Communication between the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee will allow each group to share skills and knowledge, improve coordination and promote better use of research resources on vaccine topics.
  • For more information about vaccines and autism spectrum disorders, visit the CDC Web site.