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2005 Indicators of Compliance and Quality Assurance

Alaska Early Intervention/Infant Learning Programs (EI/ILP) provide services for children ages 0 - 3 with developmental delays or disabilities.

Our mission is to partner with families to promote the healthy development of their infants and toddlers with special needs.

Each early intervention program is required to provide enrolled families with timely services and to meet certain program standards. Here is a snap shot of our statewide performance with these requirements. Please note that in Alaska, we visited each agency once every three years. The following information is only available for the agencies receiving a monitoring visit between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Data will be available for all agencies in the coming year.

  1. How quickly will your child get into services? (Indicator 7 - 45 day timeline)
  2. How well do EI/ILP agencies start services on time and provide services as planned? (Indicator 1 - Timely Services)
  3. Where do EI/ILP services take place? (Indicator 2 - Natural Environments)
  4. How are children doing as the result of early intervention service? (Indicator 3 - Child Outcomes)
  5. How well do services assist with family needs? (Indicator 4 - Family Outcomes)
  6. What percent of Alaska infants and toddlers (birth to one and under three years of age) are enrolled throughout the state? (Indicators 5 & 6 - Percent of Infant and Toddlers Enrolled)
  7. What happens after your child turns 3? (Indicator 8 - Transition)
Indicator 7 - APR FFY05 (July 2005 - June 2006)
Effective General Supervision
Part C / Child Find

Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation Family Infant ToddlerProgram

(Bethel)

Family Outreach Center for Understanding Special Needs
(Chugiak)

Frontier Community Services ILP
(Kenai)

Homer Children's Services ILP
(Homer)
Mat-Su Services for Children & Adults
(Wasilla)

Norton Sound Health Corporation ILP
(Nome)

Total Ave Percent
# of eligible infants and toddler files with IFSPs 10 10 8 10 10 8 56
# of eligible infants and toddler files with IFSPs 7 9 8 10 9 3 46
% of eligible infantsand toddlers with IFSP for whom and evaluation, assessment and initial IFSP meeting were conducted within Part C’s 45-day timeline. 70% 90% 100% 100% 90% 38% 82

Adjusted for appropriate justification (family or inclement weather)

(10)
100%
(9)
90%
(8)
100%
(10)
100%
(9)
90%
(3)
38%
88%

2. How well are Early Intervention/Infant Learning Program (EI/ILP) agencies doing at starting services on time and providing services as planned?

Early intervention services include developmental screening and evaluation of your child to determineif your child qualifies for the program. An Individual Family Service’s Plan (IFSP) is developed by an early childhood developmental team, which includes you and your family. Once this plan is completed, servicescan start for you and your child.

From July 2005 – June 2006, EI/ILP provided services, as they were planned 84% ofthe time. A shortage of professional pediatric therapists affected the delivery of therapy during this year. The Alaska statewide goal isto provide services as planned 100% of the time.
APR2005 (July 2005 – June 2006) Indicator 1. Timely Service Provision
Alaska Early Intervention / Infant Learning Program Providers Monitoredin FFY05

Percent of Intervention Services Provided as Planned on IFSP

Percent following 12-month plan of improvement

Family Outreach Center for Understanding Special Needs 100% NA
Frontier Community Services ILP 100% NA
Homer Children's Services ILP 100% NA
Mat-Su Services for Children& Adults 100% NA
Norton Sound Health Corporation ILP 13% 100%
Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation Family Infant Toddler Program 89% 100%
Note: agencies with 100% were not required toprovide an improvement plan for this indicator.

3. Where do Early Intervention/Infant Learning Program (EI/ILP) services take place?

EI/ILP provides services in inclusive settings and natural environments. Federal Law (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) “states that services must be provided in a location where infants and toddlers of the same age without disabilities would typically be found. This could be in the home, a childcare center, afamily childcare location, Early Head Start, a story hour, or other community-based program” (National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Family Corner Definitions Page, 2007).

Alaska’s EI/ILP services were held in the naturalenvironment 94.5% of the time between July 2005 – June 2006. Our statewide goal is to serve 95% of ourenrolled children in the natural environment. This allows flexibility for the IFSP team to choose locations other thanthe natural environment when a child’s need require another setting.

National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, “Natural Environments (Part C)”, Family Corner Definitions Page, May 9, 2007. http://www.nectac.org/topics/inclusion/familycorner/family.asp

Indicator 2 Natural Environments - APR FFY05 (July 2005 - June 2006)
Intervention Services Provided as Planned on IFSP

Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation Family Infant Toddler Program

(Bethel)

Family Outreach Center for Understanding Special Needs
(Chugiak)

Frontier Community Services ILP
(Kenai)

Homer Children's Services ILP
(Homer)
Mat-Su Services for Children & Adults
(Wasilla)

Norton Sound Health Corporation ILP
(Nome)

All electronic child records
Percent of infants and toddlers with IFSPs whoprimarily receive early intervention services in the home or programs fortypically developing children. 98% 99% 100% 100% 99% 100%

Settings Where Early Intervention Services Were Provided Children Enrolled for Part C Services, Alaska EI/ILP
Settings 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Natural Environment* 616 606 570 601 577 607
Other Settings 35 28 55 40 33 35
TOTAL 651 634 625 641 610 642
Percent Receiving
Services in Natural
Environment
94.6% 95.6% 91.2% 93.8% 94.6% 94.5%
*Natural Environment settings are: the child's home and programs for typically developing children
Source: Alaska's619 Child Count Data reported to OSEP (as of December 1st each year)

4. How are children doing as the result of early intervention service?

  1. Early intervention is dedicatedto helping your child enhance their developmental strengths, such aslearning new skills, getting their needs, and expressing their emotions. Each child’s skills are assessed on an ongoing basis. Near the end of your child’s enrollment, the IFSP team will re-assess how well your child has learned these new skills. This information is currently in the process of analysis. Data for the state and individual EI/ILP agencies will be available in the coming year.

5. How are families doing as the result of early intervention service? Indicator 4 - Family Outcomes

Early intervention is a family centered program. Your family needsare very important to the planning process. Each EI/ILP agency will assist you inassessing and meeting your needs related to the care and development of your child. In May 2006, aquestionnaire was mailed to families with children eligible for Part Cservices enrolled for Alaska EI/EI/ILP services at any time between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2005 and who had received services for at least 6 months. Completed questionnaires were received from 201 families, representing 18 grantee agencies statewide. The response rate was 25%, which provided a valid representation of the families in Alaska. The response rate was not largeenough to provide valid results by agency or region. The questionnaire had specific itemsrelated to how early intervention services have helped the family: A. Know their rights; B. Effectively communicate their children's needs; and C. Help their children develop and learn. The results of this survey provide Alaska’s baseline data for setting targets. Click here to see the statewide resultsof this statewide survey.

A. Know their rights;

B. Effectively communicate their children's needs; and

C. Help their children develop and learn.

A. When asked,” To what extent has early intervention helped your family know andunderstand your rights? ” 193 families responded.


94.3% of families responded that Alaska’s early intervention services helpedtheir family know their rights (indicated by a rating of 3 or higher). 64.2% of these families responded that Alaska’searly intervention has done a good to excellent job of helping them know theirfamily’s rights (indicated with a rating of 5 or higher). The average ratingwas 5.03.

Count 6 5 25 33 48 24 52
Percent 3.1% 2.6% 13.0% 17.1% 24.9% 12.4% 26.9%
Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Early intervention has not helped us know about our family's rights Early intervention has done a few things to help us know about our rights Early intervention has done a good job of helping us know our family's rights Early intervention has done an excellent job of helping us know about our family's rights

B. When asked, "To what extent has early intervention helped your family effectively communicate your child's needs?" 195 families responded.

97.5% of families responded that early intervention services helped their family effectively communicate their children’s needs (indicated by a rating of 3 or higher).79.5% of the families said that Alaska’s early intervention has done a good to excellent job at helping their family effectively communicate their children’s needs (indicated with a rating of 5 orhigher). The average rating was 5.43.

Count 3 2 14 21 64 32 59
Percent 1.5% 1.0% 7.2% 10.8% 32.8% 16.4% 30.3%
Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Early intervention has not helped us effectively communicate our child’s needs Early intervention has done a few things to help us to effectively communicate our child’s needs Early intervention has done a good job of helping us to effectively communicate our child’s needs Early intervention has done an excellent job of helping us to effectively communicate our child’s needs

C. When asked,” To what extent has early intervention helped your family be able to help your child develop and learn? 195families responded.

98.0% of families responded that early intervention services have helped them to help their children develop and learn (indicated with a rating of 3 or higher). 85.2% of the families indicated that Alaska’s early intervention has done a good to excellent job of helping them help their children develop and learn (indicated with a rating of 5 or higher).The average rating was 5.76.

Count 2 2 10 15 51 33 82
Percent 1.0% 1.0% 5.1% 7.7% 26.2% 16.9% 42.1%
Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Early intervention has not helped us helpour child develop and learn Early intervention has done a few things to help us sothat we can help our child develop and learn Early intervention has done a good job of helping us helpingus help our child develop and learn Early intervention has done an excellent job of helping us help our child develop and learn

6. What percent of Alaska infants and toddlers (birth to one and under three years of age) are enrolled throughout the state?

Indicators 5 & 6 - Percent of Infant & Toddlers Enrolled

Percent of infants and toddlers birth to 1 with IFSPs compared to:

A. Other States with similar eligibility definitions; and
B. National data.

EI/ILP strives to provide services to all infants and toddlers with developmental delays and or disabilities who qualify for services. EI/ILP served 9% of infants under the age ofone from July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2006. Alaska exceeded seven of twelve other states with similar eligibility definitions in this indicator. This is an increased ranking of two in the previous year, at which time Alaska exceeded five other states. Alaska is close to the FFY05 national average of 0.95% for this indicator.

Children Birth to 1 Receiving Part C Services in Alaska and in States with Similar Eligibility Definitions - 2005* Number and Percent of the State Population
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
State # % # % # % # % # % # %
Average of
Moderate States
1.0 0.9 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9
Alaska 102 1.1 94 0.9 92 0.9 90 0.9 83 0.8 96 0.9
Other Moderate States:
Colorado 825 1.3 466 0.7 453 0.7 444 0.7 505 0.7 492 0.7
Delaware 194 1.9 179 1.7 205 1.9 201 1.8 148 1.3 109 1.0
Illinois 1,450 0.8 998 0.5 1,291 0.7 1,675 0.9 1,954 1.1 1,943 1.1
Indiana 1,267 1.5 1,501 1.7 1,593 1.9 1,395 1.6 1,456 1.7 1,217 1.4
Kentucky 500 0.9 473 0.9 432 0.8 325 0.6 251 0.5 274 0.5
Minnesota 384 0.6 388 0.6 457 0.7 472 0.7 282 0.4 318 0.5
Missouri 486 0.7 309 0.4 417 0.6 465 0.6 514 0.7 552 0.7
New Jersey 554 0.5 672 0.6 631 0.6 677 0.6 629 0.5 640 0.6
New York 1,912 0.8 2,313 0.9 2,837 1.1 2,640 1.0 2,793 1.1 2,619 1.0
Puerto Rico 516 0.9 222 0.4 231 0.4 187 0.3 213 0.4 234 0.5
Rhode Island 165 1.3 181 1.5 220 1.8 227 1.9 214 1.7 246 1.9
South Dakota 59 0.6 82 0.8 62 0.6 70 0.7 97 0.9 91 0.8

Source: Federal Resource Center, Table 8-4 (http://www.rrfcnetwork.org/images/stories/FRC/spp_mat/2006_Dec/table%208-4-2005.pdf)

*The eligibility definitions used by these states is "Moderate", according to rankings complted by NECTAC in October 2005.

National Baseline 31,832 0.8 35,879 0.9 38,564 1.0 35,963 0.9 38,192 0.9 39,649 1.0

Percent of infants and toddlers birth to 3 with IFSPs compared to:

A. Other States with similar eligibility definitions; and
B. National data.

Early Intervention/Infant Learning Program (EI/ILP) served 2.1% of all Alaskan infants and toddlers under the age of 3 between July 1, 2004 and June 30, 2005.

This demonstrated an increase from the baseline data of 2.0% (July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004).

Alaska continues to move toward the national average of 2.3%. Alaska exceeded three of twelve other states with similar (moderate) eligibility definitions in this indicator.

Children Birth to 3 Receiving Part C Services in Alaska and in States with Similar Eligibility Definitions -2005 *Number and Percent of the State Population
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
State # % # % # % # % # % # %
Average of
Moderate States
2.3 2.3 2.5 2.5 2.6 2.7
Alaska 651 2.3 634 2.2 625 2.1 641 2.1 610 2.0 642 2.1
Other Moderate States:
Colorado 4,151 2.3 3,068 1.6 2,854 1.4 3,148 1.5 3,484 1.7 3,754 1.9
Delaware 1,003 3.2 907 2.9 1,034 3.2 953 2.9 1,006 3.1 985 2.9
Illinois 11,506 2.2 10,021 1.9 10,906 2.0 13,140 2.4 15,318 2.9 16,175 3.0
Indiana 7,707 3.0 8,645 3.4 8,614 3.3 9,543 3.7 10,067 3.9 9,890 3.8
Kentucky 3,510 2.2 3,867 2.4 4,176 2.6 3,903 2.4 3,666 2.3 3,549 2.2
Minnesota 2,948 1.5 3,052 1.6 3,267 1.7 3,502 1.8 6,039 1.5 3,209 1.6
Missouri 3,039 1.4 2,825 1.3 2,942 1.3 3,423 1.5 3,445 1.5 3,356 1.5
New Jersey 5,470 1.6 6,434 1.9 7,252 2.1 8,085 2.3 7,790 2.2 8,815 2.5
NewYork 26,934 3.7 30,417 4.1 35,997 4.8 33,026 4.4 32,232 4.3 32,588 4.3
Puerto Rico 3,230 1.8 2,983 1.7 2,778 1.6 2,486 1.4 3,139 1.8 3,900 2.6
Rhode Island 951 2.5 1,089 3.0 1,263 3.4 1,282 3.5 1,314 3.6 1,610 4.1
South Dakota 645 2.1 655 2.1 704 2.3 830 2.7 897 2.8 935 2.9

Source: Federal Resource Center, Table 8-4 (http://www.rrfcnetwork.org/images/stories/FRC/spp_mat/2006_Dec/table%208-4-2005.pdf)

*The eligibility definitions used by these states is "Moderate", according to rankings complted by NECTAC in October 2005.

National Baseline 212,733 1.8 241,744 2.0 261,378 2.2 267,734 2.2 275,484 2.2 290,753 2.3

Alaska’s EI/ILP enrolled a total of 1421 Part C eligible (experiencing significant developmental delays or disabilities) infants and toddlers from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006. Forty-five percent of these children were enrolled prior to ageone statewide.

The following table shows the number of Part C eligible children enrolled on December 1, 2005. These agencies were monitored during FFY05.

APRFFY05 (July 2005 – June 2006) Indicators 5 and 6
Agency Indicator 5: Percent of infants and toddlers birth to 1 with IFSPs Indicator 6: Percent of infants and toddlers birth to 3 with IFSPs
FCS – Soldotna, Kenai 0.7% 1.4%
FOC – Chugiak, Eagle River 0.1% 0.4%
HCS - Homer 0.5% 0.9%
MSU – Mat Su 1.6% 2.0%
NSH - Nome 2.2% 2.5%
YKH – Bethel 0.6% 3.1%
State Targets 0.9% 2.1%

7. What happens after your child turns 3? Indicator 8 - Transition

Early Intervention/Infant Learning Program (EI/ILP) programs assists enrolled children and their families to prepare for other needed services after a child's third birthday.

Transition planning can begin at any time during the child's enrollment, however a transition meeting is held at least 90 days prior to the child's third birthday.This meeting is held to discuss available resources and the type of services you wish to have for your child.

As your child turns 3, he or she may transition from EI/ILP to Early Childhood Special Education, Head Start, childcare or other early childhood programs.

EI/ILP is required to assist you with timely transition services. This planning includes:

A. Developing an IFSP with transition steps and services;
B. Notifying the school district if a child is potentially eligible for Preschool Special Education Services; and
C. Holding a transition meeting.

The statewide EI/ILP goal for all transition services is 100%.Between July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006, transition services were held:

A. 94% - Percent of children exiting Part C who have an IFSP with transition steps and services experienced slight slippage over last year (95%). Three of six local agencies had findings related to this indicator.

B. 86% - Percent of children exiting Part C and potentially eligible for Part B where notification to the LEA occurred experienced slippage in this indicator over the past year (95%). Two of six agencies had findings with this indicator.

C. 85% - Percent of children exiting Part C and potentially eligible for Part B where the transition conference occurred also experienced slippage in this indicator over the past year (95%). Two of six agencies had findings with this indicator.

APR FFY05 (July 2005 - June 2006)
Indicator 8 Effective General Supervision Part C / Effective Transition

Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation Family Infant Toddler Program

(Bethel)

Family Outreach Center for Understanding Special Needs
(Chugiak)

Frontier Community Services ILP
(Kenai)

Homer Children's Services ILP
(Homer)
Mat-Su Services for Children & Adults
(Wasilla)

Norton Sound Health Corporation ILP
(Nome)

Total Ave Percent
All electronic child records - aggregate data
% of children exiting Part C who received timely transition planning to support the child's transition to preschool and otherappropriate community Services by the third birthday.
A. IFSPs with transition steps and services 89% 87% 89% 100% 100% 100% 94%
B. Notification to LEA if child potentiallyeligible for Part B 58% 100% 100% 60% 100% 100% 86%
C. Transition meetings 90% 22% 100% 100% 100% 100% 85%
Five-year plan of EI/ILP program improvement